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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 29, 2017 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. donald trump's chief—of—staff quits after days of infighting at the white house. reince preibus had been accused of leaking information to the press. he says he resigned because the president wanted to take a "different direction". good morning. it's saturday, 29thjuly. also ahead, riot officers under attack in east london. fireworks and bottles are thrown during a protest over the death of man who had been restrained by police. the pope and theresa may lead the tributes to charlie gard as his life support is switched off. in sport, a dream of a day for england's debutant. toby roland jones, takes four south african wickets, to put england on top, in the third test at the oval. plus, a moment of tv history. casualty celebrates 30 years on air
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with a special episode filmed in just one take, with just one camera. and sarah has the weather. good morning. it's a mixed picture through the weekend. there are spells of sunshine, but blustery showers. i will bring you the details in about 15 minutes. thanks, sarah, see you then. good morning, first our main story. donald trump's top white house aid has resigned after days of public infighting at the white house. earlier this week chief—of—staff, reince priebus, was described as a paranoid schizophrenic by the president's new director of communications. the new man in charge of making sure the administration runs smoothly is former military generaljohn kelly. here's our north america correspondent peter bowes. another tweet, another resignation, another day in the trump presidency. reince priebus is the latest senior figure in the white house to leave his job prematurely. the shortest serving chief—of—staff in history.
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he is being replaced by a retired four—star general. john kelly is currently in charge of the department of homeland security. donald trump revealed that reince priebus had been replaced at the end of a tumultuous week in washington. earlier, the two men travelled together to an event in long island, where mr trump lavished praise onjohn kelly. one of our real stars. truly one of our stars. the president was heading back to the white house that he tweeted news of general kelly's newjob. he spoke briefly to reporters. reince is a good man. john kelly will do a fantasticjob. general kelly has been a star. done an incredible job thus far. respected by everybody. a great, great american. reince priebus a good man. there was a time when they seemed so close. ever since the election, the right—hand man, reince priebus, rarely far from the president's side. but he tendered his resignation on thursday, following what he said was several days of discussions. the president wanted to go
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in a different direction. i support him in that. the president has a right to hit a reset button. i think it's a good time to hit the reset button. i think he was right to hit the reset button and i think that it was something that i think the white house needs. i think it's healthy and i support him in it. asked about an interview in which he was described by the new white house communications chief, anthony scaramucci, as "a paranoid schizophrenic," mr priebus said "he didn't want to get into the mud." next week, a new general is in charge. violence has broken out in east london during protests about the death of a man shortly after he was restrained by police a week ago. the independent police complaints commission is investigating the death of 20—year—old rashan charles. last night, bottles and fireworks were thrown at officers in the dalston area of hackney. danjohnson was at the scene of last night's trouble.
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a tense night in part of east london. a fleet of police riot vans faces a burning barricade. fireworks and bottles being thrown. hundreds of officers were sent to force people back. move away, the dogs are coming out. after a peaceful protest earlier in the day ended in violence. well, it's just after midnight and things have started to calm down. a lot of people have moved away and left. but there are still quite a lot of police officers here in heavy riot gear. this was sparked by the death of rashan charles. the 20—year—old was chased into a shop by police. officers say he tried to swallow something. there was a struggle and he became ill. just over an hour later, rashan charles was declared dead. he's the third young man to lose his life after being stopped by police in london injust
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over a month. they're angry and they're confused as they are not represented in life itself. they have to sell drugs. they have to carry knives because they're living in fear. they have to spirituality. they have to sell drugs? yeah. why? they're forced into situations where they don't understand how to life, how to make money and how to work for what they want because they don't want to work for the system. it was concern and anger at the system that last night spilled out onto the streets. police say whatever the frustrations, this is not what the family of rashan charles wanted. some tense scenes. dan is there this morning. dan, what's it like now. good morning. absolutely calle and quiet here this morning and there has been a big clean up operation under taken by the council already. so there is very little sign of what happened last night. but what there
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is here is a sign of what happened last week. that there is the shop where rashan charles was wrestled to the ground by police. that's where he was in that con fondtration and it was shortly after that that he lost his life and that's where the shrine has built up with flowers and candles, tributes left there and just over here, is the junction here in dal ston just over here, is the junction here in dalston in just over here, is the junction here in dal ston in hackney in east london where the focus of last night's demonstration ended up. this is where the flash point really was where it turned violent. some of the demonstrators pushed bins into the fire and set fire to them. a mattress was set alight too. this is where riot officers were confronted by people throwing bottles at them and setting off fireworks too. later today there will be a further protest outside the local police station. rashan charles' father will be leading that delstration, but the family appealed for people to stay calment they are working with the
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independent police complaints commission that are investigating the circumstances around this death, but it is clear it caused concern and unsees in this community. people are sensitive about the way that the police deal with young men in this pa rt police deal with young men in this part of london. dan, for the moment, thank you very much. the north korean leader, kim jong—un, has said that the whole of the us mainland is now within firing range following his military‘s latest intercontinental missile test. it is the second such missile to be launched by pyongyang this month and reached an altitude of more than 2,000 miles. the us and south korea has responded by carrying out a series of missile exercises. nearly a quarter of shops are breaking the law, by selling knives to underage people, some as young as 13. that is according to new figures from the local government association, which says some retailers, including two supermarket chains, have been caught out. this is completely avoidable. shops, retailers, can put in place processes to stop young people accessing knives and we believe that more needs to be done to target those retailers who are offending.
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more than 50 mps have backed calls for urgent improvements to britain's broadband network. the british infrastructure group wants automatic compensation for families who do not get the internet speeds they pay for. ofcom says it's already taking firm and wide—ranging action to protect customers. the bbc‘s longest running medical drama casualty is making history tonight — the entire episode has been filmed on a single camera, in just one take. it's a first in british television and marks its 30th anniversary, as sharuna sagar reports. there's a baby in there! there's a baby in the house. this whole episode of casualty was filmed all in one go, so that's one continuous shot
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with one hand—held camera for a full 48 minutes. filming a storyline with real—time action throws up all manner of challenges. so, why did they do it? well, it's the closest the show can get to reflect the nhs front—line in its unedited rawest form. you take it easy. you have been through the wars yourself. has anyone said anything about the baby? it took two weeks of rehearsals for the cast and crew, and eight full—length takes were filmed and it is the last one of those which will make it to air tonight. casualty is on bbc one at 9.05pm tonight. it's 9. 9. 9.10am. we will return to one of our main stories, charlie gard. we can show
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the new pictures released by charlie gard's family, showing a healthier charlie. the debate about his care has provoked international reaction. the debate about his care provoked international reaction including opinions from pope francis, who said he would pray for his parents, and all who loved him. let's talk about this with stephanie nimmo whose 12—year—old daughter daisy was born with a rare genetic syndrome, and died six months ago at great ormond street hospital. the debate about his care provoked international reaction including opinions from pope francis, who said he would pray for his she's in our london newsroom. our thoughts are with charlie's pa rents. our thoughts are with charlie's parents. tell us about what you went through and how you managed to cope with everything that happened to daisy? my thoughts are with chris and connie and everyone that cared for charlie. i, myself, experienced the same six months ago we had to ta ke the same six months ago we had to take the decision to remove daisy‘s life support while nevis in
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intensive care in great ormond street and it is the most horrific thing a parent has to do. it's the ha rd est thing a parent has to do. it's the hardest thing you have to do. we took her to the hospital after she had died, passed away and spent some really lovely healing time with her. in the hospice afterwards. i know you had a plan for daisy to die at home and those plans didn't work out quite how you wanted them to. but also given everything that we have seen and heard this week about charlie gard and indeed over the last few weeks, you also know very closely the processes and certainly what the staff at great ormond street must have been going through? and i can only talk about my particular situation, but we had 12 years to adjust to the fact that we had a life limited child. i worked with the palliative care team at great ormond street to develop end of life plans for daisy, but when it came down to it, things happened so quickly and i wanted to
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bring her home for her final hours and if that wasn't possible to bring her to the hospice which she had grown to love over the course of her life, but in the end when the co nsulta nt life, but in the end when the consultant in the intensive care unit explained to me that potentially she could die in the ambulance transfer we felt the safest option was to switch off her life support in the intensive care unit. i was there with her. she was surrounded with love. she shoe she was loved at the end and yeah, it's the hardest thing i have ever had to do. we're grateful for you being able to explain all of us because i know it's not easy. a lot has been made about the communication, the relationship between the hospital and the parents and the legal authorities and i suppose where there is a danger that many people forget about the child at the centre of this and i know you were really keen to make sure that daisy remained at the centre of this. it was about doing halfs right for her?
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this is what i found. things were changing constantly with daisy, but the most important thing was to work actually, in my personal situation, i had actually, in my personal situation, ihada actually, in my personal situation, i had a long—term relationship with the palliative team and with our hospice team and we developed plans and daisy was at the centre of them all and for me, all the decisions we re all and for me, all the decisions were based on daisy‘s quality of life. i was fortunate that there was a long period where she was able to go to school. she was able to go out and play with friends. before her health really, really deteriorated and every decision i ever made about daisy and her care was based on is this going to improve her quality of life? is this going to be something that helps her dot things that she wa nts to that helps her dot things that she wants to do? what's been so different, i think we can say in this case and there have been similar cases before, but the role social media played. there has been a lot of outpouring of support and good wishes for the family, but at the same time there has been criticism, some questioning of the
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role that the hospital played and whether the parents should be pursuing this? i'm interested in what difference that would make to you, seeing the public support, but then also there has been a lot of criticism of the hospital in this case. that's clearly in this case wasn't helpful? i don't think it was helpful. i think, wasn't helpful? i don't think it was helpful. ithink, unfortunately, sitting on the sidelines as someone that has been through exactly that situation, you see a lot on twitter and on social media from armchair commentators and i think every situation is individual to the child and unless you're in that situation, you can never know. the doctors, are doing their best and the medical teams, everyone, all they care about, charlie's parents, everyone, it is all about charlie and every situation is individual to it the child and every decision has to be based on what's the best thing for the child at the centre of it all? social media can be incredible. i
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started a blog when daisy started to really deteriorate because i wanted to help people understand what it's like caring for a life limited child and a child who is not going to live to adulthood and that was a way of managing the information, but i can absolutely see how it can get out of control and people can use the story to fuel their own agendas as well. of course, this is all too recent for you, but i wonder whether you would have any advice or support for connie yeates and chris gard about how they cope with the coming weeks and months? i know it's not what they wanted, but actually, being in a hospice setting now is probably one of the best things for them. personally, after daisy died and we took her to the hospice, we brought her home for a night and took her to the hospice and the hospice cocooned us. the hospice and the hospice cocooned us. we werejust the hospice and the hospice cocooned us. we were just able to switch off in some ways. people were there to talk to us, to support us, there
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we re talk to us, to support us, there were therapists there to just listen andi were therapists there to just listen and i think you know, now, this is where the hospice and children's hospices really play such a strong role at the child's end of life and after a child has died, we are still supported by the hospice. my children receive therapy support from them and just helping with the practical arrangements. it's only six months this weekend since we lost daisy. it's such early days, but i don't know how i could have got through it without the support of our hospice. stephanie, it is really good to talk to you. just six months since daisy passed away, i know it has not been easy to talk to us know it has not been easy to talk to us this morning, but we're really grateful for your insight. our thoughts, are both with stephanie and her family thoughts, are both with stephanie and herfamily and also thoughts, are both with stephanie and her family and also with charlie gard's family too. it's 9.17am. let's ask sarah what is
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happening with the weather. it is looking a little more promising. this weekend is not a write off. there is some sunshine to start off the day. here is the view taken by one of our weather watchers in twickenham earlier in the day. we have got sunshine there. if we look at the satellite image, we can see where the cloud is. more patchy cloud further north—west. here we have an area of low pressure sitting there. the low pressure will drive in scattered blustery showers across scotla nd in scattered blustery showers across scotland and northern ireland today. further south, this weather front mainly along the english channel, it will push northwards. so it will be bringing outbreaks of rain across southern parts of england and into south wales too. further north, sunny spells in between the showers across scotland and northern ireland. quite cool and breezy and blust ary, 17 or 18 celsius. slightly drier as we move our way
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south down across southern england and wales too. for south wales in the south—west of england, this is apm. the rain will be setting in here. so quite a windy, wet afternoon to come. a similar picture for much of southern england. we have got the rain moving in. it won't be raining all the time. after a dry start at the oval, this afternoon does look like it will bring intreptions to play with the arrival of rain and the breeze picking up too. as we head into the evening hours, the rain across southern england and south wales shifts its way further northwards. really much of england and wales will see a spell of rain and brisk winds tonight before that slowly eases away towards the east. east through the early hours of tomorrow morning and we will see a feed of showers coming in across northern and western coasts in particular. temperatures down to around 12 to 15 celsius. so what about tomorrow? again, low pressure not far away. this first area of low pressure brings its weather fronts off towards the east. the rain clears and then we have got low pressure
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out to the north—west with the winds rattling around the low pressure. it will drive in further showers to northern and western areas in particular with a few thunderstorms likely too. further south and east, you are likely too. further south and east, you a re less likely too. further south and east, you are less likely to catch the showers, but there could be a few moving through during the afternoon. temperatures at best 21 celsius. it is not looking too bad for the cycling event ride london tomorrow. 21 celsius. there is a chance we could see the blustery showers. low pressure doesn't go anywhere. monday, still sitting out to the north—west. further showers rotating around the low pressure. you're more likely to see the showers across northern and western parts of the country on into month. there is a hint that drier weather will start to move up from the south. but all in all it is a changeable theme. back to you both. sair ration we are about to talk to simon calder, it is blustery across the english channel. yes. there will be lots of people off on their holidays to france. you will see
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rain and brisk winds through the english channel today, but it will be clearing up of the so bear with the weather. sarah, thank you. simon is with us. on the channel we've got as sarah was saying the winds and the storms that are meaning that people can't get the ferries. in the south of france we are facing the forest fires that are affecting travel. tens of thousands of families heading for france this weekend. and as we have been hearing, it is nasty across the channel. mind you, you will have problems before you get to the port of dover. they are warning there is long queues of trucks on the a2 and the a20. p&0 long queues of trucks on the a2 and the a20. p&o ferries are running three hours behind schedule. they say they will get you on the next sailing and you will get a free cup of tea. they have had mechanical problems and the weather is terrible and everything is looking grim. but
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when you get to france your problems are only beginning. this is the big weekend. the big day of the year. it is the big holiday and all the people who take their holidays in july are going north. all the people who take their holidays in august are going south. we have got the forest fires in the south of france which have been causing devastation. dreadful images during the week. people have been sleeping on the beach. they have been put out of their homes and campsites have been shut. which is what many people will be planning it do? if you have booked through a camping company, it isa booked through a camping company, it is a package holiday they will by 110w is a package holiday they will by now have found an alternative, but it is really difficult because this is peak season. if you're travelling independently and you happen to be flying down to the south of france, easyj et says flying down to the south of france, easyjet says they will talk about
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switching dates or destinations. but it isa switching dates or destinations. but it is a huge muddle. good luck, everybody. there has been another change in travel advice when it comes to tunisia. can we talk about that? we had that awful terror attack where 30 britons were killed on a beach in sousse in june 30 britons were killed on a beach in sousse injune 2015. we were told do not travel to tunisia, it's not safe, but that restriction has been lifted. how is that going to impact the travel market to this there? initially, there is little change. for the last two years the foreign office said we warn against all travel to tunisia as a result of that, no tour operator has been organising holidays. a small number of british people have been going in. flights have been continuing every day from london to tunis, but while france, germany and italy lifted their bans, the uk's has stayed until this week. talking to the big holiday companies, it is difficult for them to suddenly start putting new flights on. so you're probably not going to see package
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holidays coming in until about february at the earliest and it will bea february at the earliest and it will be a small test programme. if you wa nt to be a small test programme. if you want to go before then, there is a range of options, but you will be travelling probably more independently, having carried out a social media pole, of over 1300, only 18% said we want to go to tunisia. more than that said we'll go if the price is right and you can expect price cuts, i imagine to try to get people going back to what what is a lovely north african country. we have got david davis on the sofa. we have got david davis on the sofa. we were talking about a story earlier in the express. it was about a married couple, both fly with ba, love working together. they think it's great. we were talking about how that could work and whether or not it's typical. it's not typical because there is so few female
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pilots. i have not been able to find you figures for same—sex couples working for airline. only 3% of pilots are female. in britain, it is 6% on british airways, easyjet and monarch, ryanair, the same percentage and of course, the other thing is that first officers, so the morejunior thing is that first officers, so the more junior member, they thing is that first officers, so the morejunior member, they are in bigger numbers, the number of female ca pta i ns bigger numbers, the number of female captains is lower. so the chances you will be on a flight with a male and female married couple are very low indeed. simon, thank you very much. david davis is with us. let's pick up david davis is with us. let's pick up on the rest of the papers. you pulled out one about teachers not qualified in their subject. well, these are deeply worrying times for those of us who care passionately about education. i am lucky enough to bea about education. i am lucky enough to be a school governor. a quarter of teachers are not qualified in their subject. particular worries in
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physics and the languages. two in five schools have seen an increase in the past year in the number of teachers taking lessons in subjects for which they are not qualified says the times. and what is the explanation? so many teachers after three, orfour years are explanation? so many teachers after three, or four years are leaving the profession. and you know, this is coming ata profession. and you know, this is coming at a time when all those people and their families sitting at home worrying about a—level results and gcse results on the way, new marking systems coming in. i suspect there will be problems. ifear marking systems coming in. i suspect there will be problems. i fear there will be problems. it is criticising the fact that it's so difficult to stay in thejob the fact that it's so difficult to stay in the job at a decent salary level. absolutely. the reality is that teaching remains a hugely under appreciated task in this country of ours. it was so 25 years ago. it remains so today. shall we talk about this? you were
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talking about the mortgage trap earlier, weren't you? this is a story about goodbye to the 25 year loan, are we walking into a mortgage trap? they look attractive because you trap? they look attractive because y°u pay trap? they look attractive because you pay a smaller amount every month, but i pay it over a longer time period. by the time you get to the end of the term, if you get to the end of the term, if you get to the end of the term, you will have paid out more, probably tens of thousands of pounds more. of course, here are the stories. yes, there is 35 year mortgages instead of 25 year mortgages. other stories in the paper today about loans to people, four—and—a—half, five times their income and excuse me, did we learn absolutely nothing in the crash of 2007? so you then ask who is lending the money? hang on a minute, wasn't there a woman, called lady thatcher
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who used to talk an awful lot about housing and the big thing was to be able to buy your own home. and if you talk to young people today, not just from inn london, they say, "what chance have i got of buying a home unless the good old bank of mum and dad and grand mum and grandad turn up trumps?" can you merge in 30 seconds how you can do a crossword ona seconds how you can do a crossword on a sun afternoon, but get out and doa on a sun afternoon, but get out and do a walk? in 30 seconds. the times fame for its cross words, it is launching a campaign, crosswords are good for you whether at the start of your school life or at the end of your school life or at the end of your life. as far as getting out for a walk, it's me. i'm one of the people who stop walking, going on long walks, it's bad. i have got to change. you are a good man. thank you, david. it is always a pleasure
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having you with us. we're on bbc one until 10am when it's saturday kitchen. can we have finger news donal?|j have can we have finger news donal?” have reattached my finger and i'm good to go! i'm going to fill you. our special guest is greg james. you are here to face your food heaven and hell. yeah. tell me about about your food heaven? some nice bass and whitefish and italian flavours and fresh tomatoes and fresh vegetables. asparagus, maybe. we can see what we can do. tell me about your hell?” don't want to! laughter i hate cake! that's a good one. anything pickled, pickled fish. any capers. they need to be banished. so that will be my hell. capers. they need to be banished. so that will be my hell. there are two great chefs as well. we have spanish sunshine. what's cooking today?‘
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rack of lamb marredennated with capers, anchovies, black olives. vegetables and pickled onions. are you joking? vegetables and pickled onions. are youjoking? we planned very vegetables and pickled onions. are you joking? we planned very well. you like it tale yarngs you will like spanish. we have got magic from the midlands. what are you going to be making? i am going to be cooking a grilled pork chop up on the roof on the barbecue and we will have it with a south african, well apart from the finger, you do have another nine! i know. we will do it with a south african chutney and serve with a salad of radishes. it will be fantastic. suzie, you have giving us gorgeous wines. no white wine vinegar. a bit of red, white, spanish, but we are sticking european. have that brexit! you guys at home are in charge of greg's food
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heaven or food hell. at home are in charge of greg's food heaven orfood hell. go at home are in charge of greg's food heaven or food hell. go to the website and vote! no injuries. stay safe! he cut his finger last week. that's what we were trying to explain. coming up in the next half hour, we'll be joined by courteeners frontman liam fray. if you are a fan of the band, you will want to know about this, i nearly pre—empted it, stay with us, the headlines are coming up next. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. coming up before ten, we'll get the weather with sarah. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. president trump's top white house aide has resigned after days of public infighting at the white house. mr trump has replaced his chief of staff, reince priebus, with john kelly, a former military general. one official said he'd been hired with the goal of bringing more
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discipline to the administration. mr priebus said he still supported the trump administration. violence has broken out in east london during protests about the death of a man, rashan charles, who was apprehended by police a week ago. fireworks and bottles were thrown at officers in the dalston area of hackney overnight. danjohnson dan johnson was at danjohnson was at the scene last night and is there again this morning, good morning, very tense atmosphere last night, how is it this morning? yes, it's a very calm right now, but there were some quite serious disturbances, although not widespread, last night here in dalston in hackney, sparked by the death of rashan charles after he was stopped by police in that shop there. you can see the tribute that have piled up in the weeks since he lost his life, and this is the junction in hackney that was the focus of the demonstration that did eventually turned violent. there
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we re eventually turned violent. there were bins and mattress is pushed into the road to form a burning barricade, hundreds of riot officers had to come in to deal with this. it was a tense time for everybody late last night, but it doesn't look like anybody suffered any injuries, we don't believe there were arrests, and the minimal damage has been cleared up quite quickly this morning. with me is philip glanville, the morning. with me is philip gla nville, the mayor of morning. with me is philip glanville, the mayor of hackney, thanks for talking to us, are you worried by what you saw last night? there were some disturbing images on television and social media, but it is calm now, we would plead with the community for it to remain calm. if you listen to what rashan charles' family are saying, they don't want to see people causing unrest related to see people causing unrest related to his death. they have been tried to his death. they have been tried to talk to young people, listening to talk to young people, listening to their questions and anger about what happened, but channelling that towards the ipcc investigation, and
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that work has been going on during the course of the week. isjust the death of rashan charles, or is there a bigger issue about how police deal with people? there are always challenges with the relationship with the police, here in hackney we work very hard on that, and that is why we have been talking to the ipcc during the week, they have been making sure the contact with the police is intelligence led around stop and search, and that officers and young people understand their rights and responsibilities. sol think that what is sad is that it has disrupted that good relationship in hackney, a relation that has been built up with the council and community leaders and the young people themselves. there is a further protest this afternoon outside the police station, do you fear there could be more violence?” really hope there will not be any, i would echo the concerns of the family, those in the community have been saying that as well, and i
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would urge anyone coming from outside of hackney to reflect on what has been happening here in the week, listen to the people who have been saying we want protests to be calm, and act responsibly. that is the mayor of hackney, and the message has come out strongly from the family of rashan charles, they wa nt the family of rashan charles, they want any the family of rashan charles, they wa nt a ny protests the family of rashan charles, they want any protests to be peaceful, something that the police want to see too. we will keep the coverage of that throughout the bbc news channel later today, the gathering is later today, thank you. 11—month—old charlie gard has died after his life support was switched off at a hospice. his parents gave up their fight to have his genetic condition treated in america, after a high court case earlier this week. charlie's condition grabbed the attention of many around the world, including pope francis. nearly a quarter of shops are breaking the law by selling knives to underage people, some as young as 13—years—old. that's according to new figures from the local government association which says some retailers, including two supermarket chains, have been caught out.
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this is completely avoidable. shops, retailers, can put in place processes to stop young people accessing knives, and we believe that more needs to be done to target those retailers who are offending. more than 50 mps have backed calls for urgent improvements to britain's broadband network. the british infrastructure group wants automatic compensation for families who do not get the internet speeds they pay for. ofcom says it's already taking firm and wide—ranging action to protect customers. brace yourself! robbie left take that, zayn left one direction, and now marti pellow has announced he's quitting wet wet wet. after 30 years, he says he plans to concentrate on new songwriting and acting. pellow formed the band in the ‘80s,
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music plays carry on, please! they were singing to us there! it is weird how you know all the words, it is one of those songs you don't forget. ido don't forget. i do not think it is weird, do you, mike? it is not weird at all if it is one of your favourite songs! look at that hair! pellow formed the band in the ‘80s, going on to sell more than 15 million singles and albums around the world, with hits such as goodnight girl and love is all around, which spent 15 weeks at number one in 1994. iam not i am not alone in being the only one who thought they were not still together, i just assumed who thought they were not still together, ijust assumed they broke
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up together, ijust assumed they broke upa together, ijust assumed they broke up a while ago. do you think they may continue without him? iam upset may continue without him? i am upset that we didn't get angel eyes. you have been asking for it all morning, you didn't put enough money in thejoke box meter! what is going on, cricket? a bit of history, 29, england bowler toby roland—jones. .. he wasn't even born when wet wet wet... don't say that! in cricket terms, he isafairold don't say that! in cricket terms, he is a fair old age. we has waited all these years for his debut and he has made history, not since 1954 as an england bowler ta ken four wickets with so few balls. loads of historic stats! play resumes this morning at 11 o'clock, and england will be hoping to wrap up and england will be hoping to wrap up the first south african innings, quite a debut for toby roland—jones. he took four south african wickets with his first 33 balls in test cricket on a dramatic day at the oval. a brilliant century from ben stokes, reached with consecutive sixes,
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helped england to a first innings total of 353. then it was all about toby roland—jones, making his test debut, and ripping through the south african batsmen, with a little help from jimmy anderson, stuart broad and stokes again. at the close, the tourists were in real trouble on 126—8. carl frampton's fight with andres gutierrez is off after a freak accident led to the mexican having to withdraw from the contest in belfast. before all that, frampton weighed in 1lb over the nine stone limit, meaning the fight wouldn't be a world—title eliminator. then later in the evening, gutierrez slipped in the shower, causing some awful injuries, meaning the fight has been called off. disappointed, gutted, however you want to say it. a freak accident. you cannot really write things like this. i was just seeing gutierrez there. there is absolutely no way he could box.
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physically, i don't think he should be allowed to box, and he isn't. great britain have added a fourth swimming gold to their tally at the world aquatics championships in budapest. the men's 200m freestyle relay team of stephen milne, nick grainger, duncan scott and james guy successfully defended their title, with guy swimming the anchor leg, taking gb from third to first. rugby league's challenge cup has reached the semifinal stage, with both matches live on bbc tv this weekend. salford take on wigan tomorrow, but this afternoon last year's winners, hull fc, face the leeds rhinos at doncaster‘s keepmoat stadium. rhinos won the competition in 2014 and 2015, while hull have lost the last eight meetings between the sides. it looks set to be an intriguing battle for pole position
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this afternoon, when qualifying gets under way for the hungarian grand prix, after red bull's daniel ricciardo was fastest in practice yesterday. three—time world champion lewis hamilton wasn't far off the pace, but his mercedes car didn't look as dominant as it has in recent weeks. fellow britonjolyon palmer had a day to forget, though, crashing twice, with his f1 future becoming increasingly uncertain. one of britain's wimbledon champions, jordanne whiley, has announced she's pregnant. what's more, she's announced that she knew she was expecting throughout wimbledon when she and her playing partner won the wheelchair doubles title for the fourth year running. she has tweeted a picture of her latest scan, saying, "had a little help at wimbledon this year." her baby is due injanuary. we wish her well, a lovely story. show the match so she did our mug
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challenge as well! it is the world athletics at the london stadium, the end ofan athletics at the london stadium, the end of an era for mo farah on the track, usain bolt, his final big appearance, and brendan foster behind the microphone, after nearly 40 yea rs, behind the microphone, after nearly 40 years, and there is a special programme about brendan foster on bbc one this afternoon, not to be missed. iam sure missed. i am sure he's looking forward to really bittersweet. some gardening in his retirement — or probably more running! this weekend will see commemorations to mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the battle of passchendaele, which came to symbolise the horror of the great war. three months of fighting killed or injured more than 450,000 men on both sides. when it was over, the allies had gained five miles of german territory. historian nick lloyd's book takes a new look at events by using previously unexamined german documents. nick, welcome to breakfast. nice to see you, it is interesting,
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isn't it? if you think of world war i. isn't it? if you think of world war i, these are the images that spring to mind, and it does painta picture of the huge death toll on both sides, but you have been looking that in the book, and it is not all as bad as we might think in some respects? no, it isn't. when we think of the western front, we think of the horror and slaughter and mud, and we think of passchendaele, and it is that period on the western front where there was heavy rain, and it tends the battlefield into a moonscape of mud. what i try to argue in the book is that part of the battles are not like that, and the battles are not like that, and the british army are able to do significant damage to the german defenders, so i call it a loss to victory. there is a lot more to the battle tha n victory. there is a lot more to the battle than the kind of futility that become so prevalent. sorry, no, it is hard to call any of this a success ,
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it is hard to call any of this a success, huge death toll, on both sides, 450,000 men forfive miles of territory, so not a success, but in terms of what was achieved and how it could have affected the outcome of the war, hugely significant. we have to understand what we mean by success. the british tried to break out and success. the british tried to break outand did success. the british tried to break out and did not achieve that, but when they switched tactics in september to try what we called bite and hold, they are able to do significant damage to the german forces, and the germans are, by that point, in october, considering a major withdrawal, and other point the rain returns. there had been a period of dry weather, which most people do not recognise. but the rains return, the battlefield is deluged, and then any kind of decisive success kind of slips away. what is also interesting is how you look at the relationship between the war cabinet, you know, in downing street, and what was happening on
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the ground, and it almost brings a similar story to what we hear today, of how disjointed the message is from central government to actually on the ground, to the military, west added years being hindered by the aims of the war cabinet. —— where their strategy is being hindered. aims of the war cabinet. —— where their strategy is being hinderedm isa their strategy is being hinderedm is a bit ofa their strategy is being hinderedm is a bit of a mess, prime minister david lloyd george does not want an offensive, does not feel able to rain in field marshal haig, and they have different strategies on whether they should try to break through the western front, maybe move trips to italy to take out the austrians. there is no clear consensus on what to do to win the war. and also about certain generals with different armies, who had different ambitions, how they didn't correlate — the allied forces barbs not so much allied forces barbs not so much allied in their strategy. you have different approaches, and this illustrates the degree to which
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commanders are learning about or trying to find out how to fight on the western front. we know there are commanders who want a more aggressive breakthrough, and other commanders who just want to make operations concentrate on killing the enemy. and that kind of dichotomy is central to the british army in 1917. when i knew i dichotomy is central to the british army in 1917. when i knew! had dichotomy is central to the british army in 1917. when i knew i had to read this, i was thinking, great, this will be like a story almost, but the detail in this is fantastic, how many years did you take to research this? it has been a three—year project to write it. research this? it has been a three—year project to write itm offers some remarkable insights, thank you so much, the book is called passchendaele: a new history. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. donald trump continues to change his white house team, confirming on twitter he'd replaced his chief of staff with a former army general. fireworks and bottles have been thrown during a protest in hackney, east london, after the death of man who'd been restrained by police last week.
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sarah has the details about what the weather will do this weekend, really a bit ofa weather will do this weekend, really a bit of a mixed bag depending where you are living. mixed fortunes, we will all say a little bit of dry and bright weather at times, this is the view at the moment into again, some blue sky and sunshine around, but increasing amounts of cloud heading in from the south. we look at the satellite image, you can see clear skies and sunshine across central and eastern areas, more clouds towards the north—west and sitting through the english channel, but a weather front which is going to be bringing some rain to parts of southern england as we head over the next few hours. further north, sunny spells and scattered showers rattling in around an area of low pressure. in between there is sunnier and drier weather to be enjoyed through the day, so by
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the afternoon, four o'clock, plenty of showers across scotland and northern ireland, rattling through quite quickly on the breeze, so sunshine in between. your showers and more sunshine for northern england into the north midlands and wales, but you can still catch a rogue shower here. further south, cloud and rain down to the weather front pushing its way north out of the english channel, so quite windy, quite wet across the south coast, up towards east anglia too. after a dry starred for the third test at the oval, rain interrupting play at times during the course of the afternoon, turning breezy. through this evening and overnight, that reign of the south edges its way northwards, so much of england and wales will see showers, further showers across the north—west of the uk later, with temperatures falling to 10-15d. uk later, with temperatures falling to 10—15d. through the day tomorrow, low pressure, this front veering towards the east, low pressure
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towards the east, low pressure towards the east, low pressure towards the north—west, feeding in further showers. through the day tomorrow, sunny spells and blustery showers, showers most frequent and heaviest in the north and west, with thunderstorms likely, then drifting eastwards through the day, temperatures 15—21d. a few showers in the south—east, mainly dry for the cycling event, ride london tomorrow. high pressure will try to nudgein tomorrow. high pressure will try to nudge in from the south on monday, still some showers in the north and west, but a hint of drier and brighter weather in the south—east. back to you both. thanks very much for that, enjoy the weekend! our next guest arrived in the uk as a refugee when he was 15. he was born in kabul, grew up in pakistan and spent his childhood in cellars, hiding from daily rockets and bombs. after graduating from cambridge he became a doctor but has now taken a career break to launch a new scheme, which is saving lives in war zones across the world. his telemedicine system allows
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doctors in war zones to get help from specialist in the west. before we meet him, take a look at this report from world affairs editor john simpson. we hear plenty of depressing stories about afghanistan, but this isn't one of them. quite the opposite, in fact. afghanistan has one of the lowest standards of medical care in the world — the doctors often aren't very highly trained, and their equipment is pretty basic. but they can contact dr waheed arian. an afghan who qualified as a doctor in britain, he can give them detailed medical advice using social media — from his home in chester, he takes messages day and night. he calls it telemedicine. they don't have the up—to—date technologies, they don't have the cutting—edge expertise, they don't have advanced evidence—based medicine. so they need any expertise or any advice that's more world—class here, that is very useful for them.
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so i'll take the arrow and place it... now he and his team are developing new ways of showing doctors there what to do. it went very well — we discussed a medical case, we solved the problem, it was a live case in one of the hospitals in kabul, afghanistan, and using augmented reality, we discussed it, and we managed the problem. as a boy in the 1980s, waheed had to escape from the russians who'd invaded his country. he and his family were lucky to survive. when civil war flared up in afghanistan, his parents sent him on his own to britain. he was 15 and didn't speak much english, yet within four years he was studying medicine at cambridge. and he became passionate about helping people in the country of his birth.
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i'd seen so much suffering in my childhood, and that suffering was still very vivid in my memory, and i wanted to see if i could help in any way alleviate that suffering from many people that were in a similar position to mine as a child. he doesn't get much time with his family in chester. he's taken leave of absence to develop his telemedicine ideas, but in order to pay the bills, he has to work every weekend as an a&e doctor. yes, he is away a lot, and it can be hard, and it can be lonely at times, when you are on your own, and you're seeing all the other families out, but on the other side, i know that he's amazing things for humanity, he's going to be saving thousands of lives, so i look at the positive. we've come a long way in just two years, and where helping in places that have no other support, and this is so important. lives are at stake, and we can help save those lives.
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waheed arian has survived a lot. helping others in afghanistan to survive is, he says, his therapy. john simpson, bbc news. dr waheed arian is joining us now on the sofa. welcome to breakfast. thank you for having me. we now know how you got to where you are, but your ambition now to help people in war—torn countries, or where medics are struggling to get other help, what are you doing? so we have got a telemedicine organisation with around nearly 100 volunteers, and we use text, phone and voice, face time on our smartphones to advise medics in war—torn countries, as well as low resource countries. do they call you during routine examinations or
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in emergency situations kaymer we cover both emergency and non—emergency situations, and that is what sets us apart from other organisations. they can call us 24/7, any time they would like, and we cover all the specialities, and they can get a response in less than four hours. the thing that might surprise many people as the infrastructure that this needs, good connectivity, wi—fi in many cases, and in some of the images from war—torn countries, there is at the devastation, and yet the network seems pretty reliable, and that means you can do this, you can share images, high—resolution images of things like x—rays and medical scans. absolutely, when i graduated asa scans. absolutely, when i graduated as a doctor, i kept going back to help in anyway i could, and i couldn't find other doctors to come with me, because it is risky, so i have to think hard to find a
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solution, and that is how i came across telemedicine, but i modified and when i set up the charity, with live discussion. and you are having discussions with the nhs about implementing this? we hope to collaborate with some bodies within the nhs and health education england to bring back the learning, the research from all around the world to the nhs. i am here because of the nhs, and! to the nhs. i am here because of the nhs, and i would like to give back ona nhs, and i would like to give back on a massive scale, and we have all seen and had experiences of the infrastructure in other countries, and the nhs is the best structure i have seen, but we can help enhance the structure even more. thank you very much for coming in and telling your story, good luck with your work. viewers in the north west of england can watch the full documentary, waheed's wars — saving lives across the world, on monday evening at 7pm on bbc one. it will then be available on the iplayer shortly after. indie rock band courteeners have had a busy few years, with five albums, appearances at glastonbury, and the recent concert in the wake
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of the manchester terror attack. in a moment, we'll bejoined by the band's frontman, liam fray, who can tell us what's coming up next, but first here they are in action. music plays that gets you in the mood for the weekend, doesn't it? welcome, what are you up to, and acoustic tour? yeah, iam are you up to, and acoustic tour? yeah, i am going to go out on my own
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and do some acoustic dates. and you are announcing them on breakfast.” am pretty sure this is an exclusive for you guys, i am going to go out and doa for you guys, i am going to go out and do a few dates, intimate venues, play a few rather micro sites, things people haven't heard in a while. what does it let you do that you can't do with the band? while. what does it let you do that you can't do with the band?” while. what does it let you do that you can't do with the band? i guess it is free reign, there is no pressure, i guess, it is free reign, there is no pressure, iguess, because it is free reign, there is no pressure, i guess, because when you are doing the bigger gate and something goes wrong, people point the finger. but when it is just me, iam the finger. but when it is just me, i am allowed to mess up. doesn't that mean there is even more pressure? no, it is a weird one, not necessarily. but it would be good to get back, just me and six strings, place in smaller venues. and play the b—sides, often when people go to see a band, they want the hits they know. we are lucky because we have got such a loyal fan base, know. we are lucky because we have got such a loyalfan base, they know. we are lucky because we have got such a loyal fan base, they get into the back catalogue, so some of
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the old stuff, it is never played, ever, and then maybe some bits of some new stuff as well.” ever, and then maybe some bits of some new stuff as well. i have got to ask you, we have been morning wet wet wet, although we did not know that they hadn't split up, but is this the end of the courteeners? no, imean, yeah, this the end of the courteeners? no, i mean, yeah, although i am pretty sure some people might want that! but no, we are not going anywhere. you played a gig at old trafford in the wake of the terrorist attacks, a really significant event, what was it like? i mean, it was such an horrific week, time, tragedy, everything was just so intense around it and stuff. it became, obviously, it wasn't about us, about courteeners, it was about everybody else, and i am proud as a mancunian to see everybody pulled together, i suppose. it really was an amazing event, thank you so much for coming
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m, event, thank you so much for coming in, good luck on your own, enjoy it! liam craig from the courteeners. that is it from us today. iam back that is it from us today. i am back tomorrow with rachel, see you then, bye—bye. this is bbc news. donald trump names generaljohn kelly as his next chief—of—staff after days of public fighting. general kelly has been a star. he has done an incrediblejob thus far and respected by everybody. a great, great american. fireworks and bottles are hurled at police in east london during a protest over the death of a man who was restrained by police last week. pope francis leads tributes to 11—month—old charlie gard after his life support was switched off at a hospice. also in the next hour, north korea says its latest missile testis north korea says its latest missile test is a stern warning for washington. president
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